• Hiroshima & Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings: Documentary Film - People, Radiation

    The nuclear weapons debate is about public controversies relating to the use and stockpiling of nuclear weapons. More on Hiroshima & Nagasaki: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=c2d017d7a2cd5a79adeac324ae4877bf&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=Hiroshima%20Nagasaki Even before the first nuclear weapons had been developed, scientists involved with the Manhattan Project were divided over the use of the weapon. The Little Boy atomic bomb was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and the U.S.'s ethical justification for them has been the subject of scholarly and popular debate for decades. Nuclear disarmament refers to both the act of reducing or eliminating nuclear weap...

    published: 03 Jul 2012
  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings | US Army Documentary on the Aftermath

    ►My channel: http://youtube.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/TheBestFilmArchives?sub_confirmation=1 ►Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: http://twitter.com/BestFilmArch This film is a U.S. Army documentary on the aftermath of the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 6 and August 9, 1945. Historical Background / Context: The United States, with the consent of the United Kingdom as laid down in the Quebec Agreement (1943), dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945 respectively, during the final stage of World War 2 (1939-45). The two bombings remain the only use of nuclear weapons for warfare in history. In the fina...

    published: 10 Mar 2014
  • Hiroshima - 70 Years after the Bomb

    The world changed on August 6th 1945 when an atomic bomb fell on Hiroshima. This video shows the city in June 2015 with some haunting reminders of the bomb. Music: Kevin Macleod - incompetech.com Historical footage used in this video is available from https://archive.org/ and is considered public domain.

    published: 06 Aug 2015
  • 24 Hours After Hiroshima 1/3

    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. This program tells the second-by-second story of a moment that changed the world forever: the dropping of the atomic bomb on August 6, 1945. Through the eyes of those in the air and on the ground, including the last interview with the weapons test officer who armed the bomb, we'll experience the events as they unfolded that tragic day.

    published: 10 Jan 2011
  • Before/After the Hiroshima atomic bombings

    During the final stages of World War II in 1945, the United States conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan, the first on August 6, 1945 and the second on August 9, 1945. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. For six months before the atomic bombings, the United States intensely fire-bombed 67 Japanese cities. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945. The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum. By executive order of President Harry S. Truman, the U.S. dropped the nuclear weapon "Little Boy" on the city of Hiroshima on Monday, August 6, 1945, followed by the detonation of "Fat Man" over Nagasaki on Aug...

    published: 04 Jun 2011
  • Unseen Footages Of Hiroshima & Nagasaki Bombings

    The United States, with the consent of the United Kingdom as laid down in the Quebec Agreement, dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9 1945, respectively, during the final stage of World War II. The two bombings, which killed at least 129,000 people, remain the only use of nuclear weapons for warfare in history. On the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima & Nagasaki Bombings, we bring you a collection of exclusive images. Warning: Not for the faint-hearted. Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cinecurry Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cinecurrytweets

    published: 06 Aug 2015
  • How the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Severely Injured the Civilians - GRAPHIC & UNCUT

    UPDATE - Please consider the following: One Government's actions cannot be the fault of future humans and leaders. See the article here : http://withmean.in/xUVdVX The United States conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan, the first on August 6, 1945, and the second on August 9, 1945. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. Will the world be exposed to more deadly nuclear weapons in the future? you decide... Video footage taken in Hiroshima in March 1946 showing victims with severe burns According to the U.S. Department of Energy the immediate effects of the blast killed approximately 70,000 people in Hiroshima Some estimates state up to 200,000 had died by 1950, due to cancer and other long-term effects. R...

    published: 29 Dec 2011
  • Rare footage show the nightmare aftermath of Hiroshima after atomic bomb killed 140,000 people

    Rare footage show the nightmare aftermath of Hiroshima after atomic bomb killed 140,000 people Haunting images have been released showing the immediate aftermath of the American atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima 70 years ago today. Horrifically injured locals are pictured wandering along flattened streets strewn with corpses in the western Japanese city only hours after the nuclear bomb, nicknamed 'Little Boy', was dropped. Radiation in the city was so intense that everybody pictured in the chilling images would have died of exposure poisoning in the weeks, months and years that followed the August 6, 1945 attack. As Japan today commemorates the loss of 140,000 people killed in the initial blast, as well the countless numbers who died later, the incredibly rare images have no...

    published: 06 Aug 2015
  • Nagasaki, Japan: The Former Trading Post of Dejima

    http://www.TravelsWithSheila.com Dejima was an artificial island constructed in the port of Nagasaki in 1636 to segregate Portuguese residents from the Japanese and control the spread of Christianity. The Portuguese acted as liaison between Japan and China and their ships would return laden with silk while sugar was the main commodity imported by the Dutch later on. It is thought that this sugar is why Nagasaki's local cuisine became famous for its lavish use of sugar. Dejima trading post has been recreated and is most interesting.

    published: 29 Jun 2014
  • Mitsubishi Urakami Ordance Plant - Nagasaki, Post Blast

    Mitsubishi Urakami Ordance Plant. Atomic Bomb Area Nagasaki. - Uncataloged footage from the National Archives. National Archives and Records Administration - Local Identifier 127.R.285 -

    published: 11 Jan 2011
  • 10 Realities of Life After NUCLEAR Aftermath

    The Clinton haters think that a Hilldog Presidency would lead to nuclear with Russia. Donald Trump's rivals think he'd start a nuclear with everyone but Russia. Narration provided by JaM Advertising New Mexico www.tasteofjam.com If you were lucky enough to survive the initial blast then don't count your irradiated chickens just yet, because only half of the deaths from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings took place on the day they were dropped. The Little Boy bomb dropped on Hiroshima had a blast yield of 15 kilotons of TNT, and its material fissioning was only 1.7% as efficient as it should have been, yet even this apocalyptic device is considered small fry by modern standards. When a nuclear explosion takes place it kicks up radioactive dust and ash into the air; and since what co...

    published: 08 Nov 2016
  • Tale of Two Cities (1946) - Hiroshima & Nagasaki Japan after The Atomic Bombs of World War II

    The United States of America War Department presents Army-Navy Screen Magazine, a pictorial report on how the atomic bomb destroyed the people and cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan during World War 2. CHANGE BEFORE GOING PRODUCTIONS: http://www.cbgp.com http://www.facebook.com/changebeforegoingproductions http://www.twitter.com/cbgproductions http://www.gplus.to/changebeforegoing http://www.pinterest.com/cbgproductions More newsreel clips, documentaries, PSAs (Public Service Announcements), and other non-fiction videos added to the channel regularly. We hope you enjoy these movies, cartoons & animations, and other films.

    published: 22 Mar 2015
  • President Harry S. Truman reads prepared speech after dropping of atomic bomb on ...HD Stock Footage

    Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675072459_Harry-S-Truman_World-War-II_speech-on-atomic-bombs_seated-at-desk_cabin-of-ship Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. President Harry S. Truman reads prepared speech after dropping of atomic bomb on Hiroshima Japan during World War 2. US President Harry S. Truman delivers a speech following the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan during World War 2. President of the United States Harry S. Truman seated at desk in cabin of a ship underway in the Atlantic Ocean. He reads prepared speech on the atomic bomb. He states that an American aircraft dropped one bomb on Hiroshima and destroyed its usefulness to the enemy. The Japanese began the war from air at Pearl Harbor. He states about th...

    published: 08 Apr 2014
  • NAGASAKI: LIFE AFTER NUCLEAR WAR DELUXE by Susan Southard

    Susan Southard’s deluxe eBook edition of NAGASAKI: LIFE AFTER NUCLEAR WAR includes rarely-seen historic footage of the atomic blast and post-bombed Nagasaki as well as additional photographs of the city and its recovery over the past seventy years. Interspersed throughout the book are exclusive video clips of the author’s interviews with the survivors, offering readers intimate glimpses of their astonishing journeys of nuclear survival. Learn more at http://bit.ly/1O7g6PA! Purchase your copy today! Amazon: http://amzn.to/1K5Ho8i Apple: http://apple.co/1gzu8il Barnes & Noble: http://bit.ly/1Hs0i8c Google Play: http://bit.ly/1CE6VFv Kobo: http://bit.ly/1gzu2Hn Penguin Random House: http://bit.ly/1O7g6PA

    published: 28 Jul 2015
  • Japan / Hiroshima City Part 7

    Welcome to my travelchannel.On my channel you can find almost 1000 films of more than 70 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/user/nurettinodunya/playlists Hiroshima: As of 2006, the city has an estimated population of 1,154,391, while the total population for the metropolitan area was estimated as 2,043,788 in 2000.The total area of the city is 905.08 km², with a population density of 1275.4 persons per km².The population around 1910 was 143,000. Before World War II, Hiroshima's population had grown to 360,000, and peaked at 419,182 in 1942.Following the atomic bombing in 1945, the population dropped to 137,197.By 1955, the city's population had returned to pre-war levels. Hiroshima has a professional symphony orchestra, which has performed at ...

    published: 18 Apr 2013
  • Animated Cartoon: Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    http://thefilmarchive.org/ During the final stages of World War II in 1945, the Allies of World War II conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. Following a firebombing campaign that destroyed many Japanese cities, the Allies prepared for a costly invasion of Japan. The war in Europe ended when Nazi Germany signed its instrument of surrender on 8 May, but the Pacific War continued. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on 26 July 1945, threatening Japan with "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum, and two nuclear weapons developed by the Man...

    published: 28 May 2012
Hiroshima & Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings: Documentary Film - People, Radiation

Hiroshima & Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings: Documentary Film - People, Radiation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:56
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2012
  • views: 1148491
videos
The nuclear weapons debate is about public controversies relating to the use and stockpiling of nuclear weapons. More on Hiroshima & Nagasaki: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=c2d017d7a2cd5a79adeac324ae4877bf&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=Hiroshima%20Nagasaki Even before the first nuclear weapons had been developed, scientists involved with the Manhattan Project were divided over the use of the weapon. The Little Boy atomic bomb was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and the U.S.'s ethical justification for them has been the subject of scholarly and popular debate for decades. Nuclear disarmament refers to both the act of reducing or eliminating nuclear weapons and to the end state of a nuclear-free world, in which nuclear weapons are completely eliminated. Proponents of nuclear disarmament say that it would lessen the probability of nuclear war occurring, especially accidentally. Critics of nuclear disarmament say that it would undermine deterrence. Various American government officials, who were in office during the Cold War period, are now advocating the elimination of nuclear weapons. These officials include Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, Sam Nunn, and William Perry. In January 2010, Lawrence M. Krauss stated that "no issue carries more importance to the long-term health and security of humanity than the effort to reduce, and perhaps one day, rid the world of nuclear weapons". Even before the first nuclear weapons had been developed, scientists involved with the Manhattan Project were divided over the use of the weapon. Some—notably a number at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory, represented in part by Leó Szilárd—lobbied early on that the atomic bomb should only be built as a deterrent against Nazi Germany getting a bomb, and should not be used against populated cities. The Franck Report argued in June 1945 that instead of being used against a city, the first atomic bomb should be "demonstrated" to the Japanese on an uninhabited area.[2] This recommendation was not agreed with by the military commanders, the Los Alamos Target Committee (made up of other scientists), or the politicians who had input into the use of the weapon. Because the Manhattan Project was considered to be "top secret", there was no public discussion of the use of nuclear arms, and even within the U.S. government, knowledge of the bomb was extremely limited. The Little Boy atomic bomb was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. Exploding with a yield equivalent to 12,500 tonnes of TNT, the blast and thermal wave of the bomb destroyed nearly 50,000 buildings and killed approximately 75,000 people. Detonation of the "Fat Man" atomic bomb over Nagasaki occurred on 9 August 1945. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and the U.S.'s ethical justification for them has been the subject of scholarly and popular debate for decades. J. Samuel Walker suggests that "the controversy over the use of the bomb seems certain to continue". After the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world's nuclear weapons stockpiles grew, and nuclear weapons have been detonated on over two thousand occasions for testing and demonstration purposes. Countries known to have detonated nuclear weapons—and that acknowledge possessing such weapons—are (chronologically) the United States, the Soviet Union (succeeded as a nuclear power by Russia), the United Kingdom, France, the People's Republic of China, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_weapons_debate
https://wn.com/Hiroshima_Nagasaki_After_The_Atomic_Bombings_Documentary_Film_People,_Radiation
Hiroshima and Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings | US Army Documentary on the Aftermath

Hiroshima and Nagasaki After the Atomic Bombings | US Army Documentary on the Aftermath

  • Order:
  • Duration: 30:53
  • Updated: 10 Mar 2014
  • views: 134843
videos
►My channel: http://youtube.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/TheBestFilmArchives?sub_confirmation=1 ►Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: http://twitter.com/BestFilmArch This film is a U.S. Army documentary on the aftermath of the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 6 and August 9, 1945. Historical Background / Context: The United States, with the consent of the United Kingdom as laid down in the Quebec Agreement (1943), dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945 respectively, during the final stage of World War 2 (1939-45). The two bombings remain the only use of nuclear weapons for warfare in history. In the final year of the war, the Allies prepared for what was anticipated to be a very costly invasion of the Japanese mainland. The war in Europe had concluded when Germany signed its instrument of surrender on May 8, 1945. The Japanese, facing the same fate, refused to accept the Allies' demands for unconditional surrender and the Pacific War continued. Together with the United Kingdom and China, the United States called for the unconditional surrender of the Japanese armed forces in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945 - the alternative being "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese response to this ultimatum was to ignore it. On July 16, 1945, the Allied Manhattan Project successfully detonated an atomic bomb in the New Mexico desert and by August had produced atomic weapons based on two alternate designs. The 509th Composite Group of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was equipped with the specialized Silverplate version of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, that could deliver them from Tinian in the Mariana Islands. The B-29 christened Enola Gay (after the mother of its pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets). On August 6, the U.S. dropped a uranium gun-type atomic bomb (Little Boy) on the city of Hiroshima. The explosion immediately wiped out 90 percent of the city. U.S. President Harry S. Truman called for Japan's surrender 16 hours later, warning them to "expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth." Three days later, on August 9, the U.S. dropped a plutonium implosion-type bomb (Fat Man) on the city of Nagasaki. On August 15, six days after the bombing of Nagasaki and the Soviet Union's declaration of war, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito announced his country’s unconditional surrender to the Allies in a radio address. The news spread quickly, and “Victory in Japan” or “V-J Day” celebrations broke out across the United States and other Allied nations. The formal surrender agreement, that effectively ended the World War 2, was signed on September 2, aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri, anchored in Tokyo Bay. The bombings' role in Japan's surrender and their ethical justification are still debated.
https://wn.com/Hiroshima_And_Nagasaki_After_The_Atomic_Bombings_|_US_Army_Documentary_On_The_Aftermath
Hiroshima - 70 Years after the Bomb

Hiroshima - 70 Years after the Bomb

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:00
  • Updated: 06 Aug 2015
  • views: 14873
videos
The world changed on August 6th 1945 when an atomic bomb fell on Hiroshima. This video shows the city in June 2015 with some haunting reminders of the bomb. Music: Kevin Macleod - incompetech.com Historical footage used in this video is available from https://archive.org/ and is considered public domain.
https://wn.com/Hiroshima_70_Years_After_The_Bomb
24 Hours After Hiroshima 1/3

24 Hours After Hiroshima 1/3

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:15
  • Updated: 10 Jan 2011
  • views: 3486362
videos
Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. This program tells the second-by-second story of a moment that changed the world forever: the dropping of the atomic bomb on August 6, 1945. Through the eyes of those in the air and on the ground, including the last interview with the weapons test officer who armed the bomb, we'll experience the events as they unfolded that tragic day.
https://wn.com/24_Hours_After_Hiroshima_1_3
Before/After the Hiroshima atomic bombings

Before/After the Hiroshima atomic bombings

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2011
  • views: 25775
videos
During the final stages of World War II in 1945, the United States conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan, the first on August 6, 1945 and the second on August 9, 1945. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. For six months before the atomic bombings, the United States intensely fire-bombed 67 Japanese cities. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945. The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum. By executive order of President Harry S. Truman, the U.S. dropped the nuclear weapon "Little Boy" on the city of Hiroshima on Monday, August 6, 1945, followed by the detonation of "Fat Man" over Nagasaki on August 9. Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000--166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000--80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. The Hiroshima prefectural health department estimates that, of the people who died on the day of the explosion, 60% died from flash or flame burns, 30% from falling debris and 10% from other causes. During the following months, large numbers died from the effect of burns, radiation sickness, and other injuries, compounded by illness. In a US estimate of the total immediate and short term cause of death, 15--20% died from radiation sickness, 20--30% from flash burns, and 50--60% from other injuries, compounded by illness. In both cities, most of the dead were civilians. more on wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
https://wn.com/Before_After_The_Hiroshima_Atomic_Bombings
Unseen Footages Of Hiroshima & Nagasaki Bombings

Unseen Footages Of Hiroshima & Nagasaki Bombings

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:18
  • Updated: 06 Aug 2015
  • views: 44056
videos
The United States, with the consent of the United Kingdom as laid down in the Quebec Agreement, dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9 1945, respectively, during the final stage of World War II. The two bombings, which killed at least 129,000 people, remain the only use of nuclear weapons for warfare in history. On the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima & Nagasaki Bombings, we bring you a collection of exclusive images. Warning: Not for the faint-hearted. Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cinecurry Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cinecurrytweets
https://wn.com/Unseen_Footages_Of_Hiroshima_Nagasaki_Bombings
How the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Severely Injured the Civilians - GRAPHIC & UNCUT

How the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Severely Injured the Civilians - GRAPHIC & UNCUT

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:03
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2011
  • views: 442047
videos
UPDATE - Please consider the following: One Government's actions cannot be the fault of future humans and leaders. See the article here : http://withmean.in/xUVdVX The United States conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan, the first on August 6, 1945, and the second on August 9, 1945. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. Will the world be exposed to more deadly nuclear weapons in the future? you decide... Video footage taken in Hiroshima in March 1946 showing victims with severe burns According to the U.S. Department of Energy the immediate effects of the blast killed approximately 70,000 people in Hiroshima Some estimates state up to 200,000 had died by 1950, due to cancer and other long-term effects. Reports from 1950 to 2000 show that 46% of leukemia deaths and 11% of solid cancer deaths among bomb survivors were due to radiation from the bombs, the statistical excess being estimated to 94 leukemia and 848 solid cancers. Video digitally remastered by WordswithMeaning.org staff _________________ WordswithMeaning! (or WordMean) is a unique disclosure driven news editorial providing Headlines, World News, Business News, Technology News and the representation of a non-corporate media outlet supporting freedom of speech, anonymous commenting and no account registrations. WordMean does not charge for content and is funded by third-party advertisements as well as donations from readers. WordswithMeaning! is run by free-thinking contributors of various backgrounds and beliefs. Visit http://wordswithmeaning.org to keep up to date with all the news and affairs Head to http://withmean.in/discvault to browse through thousands of archives and leaks relating to almost everything Support us by donating or buying a free press encouraging shirt at withmean.in/donate-2day FACEBOOK | http://facebook.com/wordmean TWITTER | @wordswithmeanin _________________
https://wn.com/How_The_Hiroshima_Atomic_Bomb_Severely_Injured_The_Civilians_Graphic_Uncut
Rare footage show the nightmare aftermath of Hiroshima after atomic bomb killed 140,000 people

Rare footage show the nightmare aftermath of Hiroshima after atomic bomb killed 140,000 people

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:25
  • Updated: 06 Aug 2015
  • views: 16093
videos
Rare footage show the nightmare aftermath of Hiroshima after atomic bomb killed 140,000 people Haunting images have been released showing the immediate aftermath of the American atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima 70 years ago today. Horrifically injured locals are pictured wandering along flattened streets strewn with corpses in the western Japanese city only hours after the nuclear bomb, nicknamed 'Little Boy', was dropped. Radiation in the city was so intense that everybody pictured in the chilling images would have died of exposure poisoning in the weeks, months and years that followed the August 6, 1945 attack. As Japan today commemorates the loss of 140,000 people killed in the initial blast, as well the countless numbers who died later, the incredibly rare images have now gone on display together for the first time at Scotland's Secret Bunker museum in a small town in Fife.
https://wn.com/Rare_Footage_Show_The_Nightmare_Aftermath_Of_Hiroshima_After_Atomic_Bomb_Killed_140,000_People
Nagasaki, Japan: The Former Trading Post of Dejima

Nagasaki, Japan: The Former Trading Post of Dejima

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:58
  • Updated: 29 Jun 2014
  • views: 1681
videos
http://www.TravelsWithSheila.com Dejima was an artificial island constructed in the port of Nagasaki in 1636 to segregate Portuguese residents from the Japanese and control the spread of Christianity. The Portuguese acted as liaison between Japan and China and their ships would return laden with silk while sugar was the main commodity imported by the Dutch later on. It is thought that this sugar is why Nagasaki's local cuisine became famous for its lavish use of sugar. Dejima trading post has been recreated and is most interesting.
https://wn.com/Nagasaki,_Japan_The_Former_Trading_Post_Of_Dejima
Mitsubishi Urakami Ordance Plant - Nagasaki, Post Blast

Mitsubishi Urakami Ordance Plant - Nagasaki, Post Blast

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:18
  • Updated: 11 Jan 2011
  • views: 427
videos
Mitsubishi Urakami Ordance Plant. Atomic Bomb Area Nagasaki. - Uncataloged footage from the National Archives. National Archives and Records Administration - Local Identifier 127.R.285 -
https://wn.com/Mitsubishi_Urakami_Ordance_Plant_Nagasaki,_Post_Blast
10 Realities of Life After NUCLEAR Aftermath

10 Realities of Life After NUCLEAR Aftermath

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:08
  • Updated: 08 Nov 2016
  • views: 426795
videos
The Clinton haters think that a Hilldog Presidency would lead to nuclear with Russia. Donald Trump's rivals think he'd start a nuclear with everyone but Russia. Narration provided by JaM Advertising New Mexico www.tasteofjam.com If you were lucky enough to survive the initial blast then don't count your irradiated chickens just yet, because only half of the deaths from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings took place on the day they were dropped. The Little Boy bomb dropped on Hiroshima had a blast yield of 15 kilotons of TNT, and its material fissioning was only 1.7% as efficient as it should have been, yet even this apocalyptic device is considered small fry by modern standards. When a nuclear explosion takes place it kicks up radioactive dust and ash into the air; and since what comes up must come down, those who survived the immediate blast will be treated to a lovely shower of radioactive fallout material. The huge amounts of carbon thrown into the air by just a few nuclear detonations would cause a global drop in worldwide temperatures, so maybe this is the solution to climate change we've been looking for all along. If fallout were to land in your own back yard you'd probably think twice about eating those beets and cabbages now they're starting to glow in the dark. Nuclear explosions are just as deadly for machines as they are for man, so even if we are taken over by a race of artificially intelligent robots, they'll have as much to fear from nukes as we do. Since most nuclear air raid sirens were decommissioned in the 1990s, many nations have now implemented text messaging systems to inform the public in the event of a nuclear assault. After the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki a term was developed to describe those who survived - Hibakusha. When the sole purpose of humanity is one of survival, those tiny slithers of precious metal and paper become about as pointless as putting on sunblock when the Tsar Bomba strikes. When the bombs drop a Government loses much of its authority almost immediately, even if many senior figures are still alive afterwards.
https://wn.com/10_Realities_Of_Life_After_Nuclear_Aftermath
Tale of Two Cities (1946) - Hiroshima & Nagasaki Japan after The Atomic Bombs of World War II

Tale of Two Cities (1946) - Hiroshima & Nagasaki Japan after The Atomic Bombs of World War II

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:03
  • Updated: 22 Mar 2015
  • views: 20674
videos
The United States of America War Department presents Army-Navy Screen Magazine, a pictorial report on how the atomic bomb destroyed the people and cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan during World War 2. CHANGE BEFORE GOING PRODUCTIONS: http://www.cbgp.com http://www.facebook.com/changebeforegoingproductions http://www.twitter.com/cbgproductions http://www.gplus.to/changebeforegoing http://www.pinterest.com/cbgproductions More newsreel clips, documentaries, PSAs (Public Service Announcements), and other non-fiction videos added to the channel regularly. We hope you enjoy these movies, cartoons & animations, and other films.
https://wn.com/Tale_Of_Two_Cities_(1946)_Hiroshima_Nagasaki_Japan_After_The_Atomic_Bombs_Of_World_War_Ii
President Harry S. Truman reads prepared speech after dropping of atomic bomb on ...HD Stock Footage

President Harry S. Truman reads prepared speech after dropping of atomic bomb on ...HD Stock Footage

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2014
  • views: 58269
videos
Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675072459_Harry-S-Truman_World-War-II_speech-on-atomic-bombs_seated-at-desk_cabin-of-ship Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. President Harry S. Truman reads prepared speech after dropping of atomic bomb on Hiroshima Japan during World War 2. US President Harry S. Truman delivers a speech following the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan during World War 2. President of the United States Harry S. Truman seated at desk in cabin of a ship underway in the Atlantic Ocean. He reads prepared speech on the atomic bomb. He states that an American aircraft dropped one bomb on Hiroshima and destroyed its usefulness to the enemy. The Japanese began the war from air at Pearl Harbor. He states about the Armed forces and the production of the atomic bombs in the United States. US is now prepared to completely destroy every productive enterprise of Japan. US is prepared to destroy Japanese docks,factories and communications to make war. He states that US have spent more than two billion dollars on the greatest scientific gamble in history and have won. This is due to the greatest achievement of organized science in history. Location: Atlantic Ocean. Date: August 6, 1945. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
https://wn.com/President_Harry_S._Truman_Reads_Prepared_Speech_After_Dropping_Of_Atomic_Bomb_On_...Hd_Stock_Footage
NAGASAKI: LIFE AFTER NUCLEAR WAR DELUXE by Susan Southard

NAGASAKI: LIFE AFTER NUCLEAR WAR DELUXE by Susan Southard

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  • Duration: 1:02
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2015
  • views: 193
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Susan Southard’s deluxe eBook edition of NAGASAKI: LIFE AFTER NUCLEAR WAR includes rarely-seen historic footage of the atomic blast and post-bombed Nagasaki as well as additional photographs of the city and its recovery over the past seventy years. Interspersed throughout the book are exclusive video clips of the author’s interviews with the survivors, offering readers intimate glimpses of their astonishing journeys of nuclear survival. Learn more at http://bit.ly/1O7g6PA! Purchase your copy today! Amazon: http://amzn.to/1K5Ho8i Apple: http://apple.co/1gzu8il Barnes & Noble: http://bit.ly/1Hs0i8c Google Play: http://bit.ly/1CE6VFv Kobo: http://bit.ly/1gzu2Hn Penguin Random House: http://bit.ly/1O7g6PA
https://wn.com/Nagasaki_Life_After_Nuclear_War_Deluxe_By_Susan_Southard
Japan / Hiroshima City Part 7

Japan / Hiroshima City Part 7

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  • Duration: 10:06
  • Updated: 18 Apr 2013
  • views: 30969
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Welcome to my travelchannel.On my channel you can find almost 1000 films of more than 70 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/user/nurettinodunya/playlists Hiroshima: As of 2006, the city has an estimated population of 1,154,391, while the total population for the metropolitan area was estimated as 2,043,788 in 2000.The total area of the city is 905.08 km², with a population density of 1275.4 persons per km².The population around 1910 was 143,000. Before World War II, Hiroshima's population had grown to 360,000, and peaked at 419,182 in 1942.Following the atomic bombing in 1945, the population dropped to 137,197.By 1955, the city's population had returned to pre-war levels. Hiroshima has a professional symphony orchestra, which has performed at Wel City Hiroshima since 1963. There are also many museums in Hiroshima, including the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, along with several art museums. The Hiroshima Museum of Art, which has a large collection of French renaissance art, opened in 1978. The Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum opened in 1968, and is located near Shukkei-en gardens. The Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, which opened in 1989, is located near Hijiyama Park. Festivals include Hiroshima Flower Festival and Hiroshima International Animation Festival.Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, which includes the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, draws many visitors from around the world, especially for the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony, an annual commemoration held on the date of the atomic bombing. The park also contains a large collection of monuments, including the Children's Peace Monument, the Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims and many others. Hiroshima's rebuilt castle (nicknamed Rijō, meaning Koi Castle) houses a museum of life in the Edo period. Hiroshima Gokoku Shrine is within the walls of the castle. Other attractions in Hiroshima include Shukkei-en, Fudōin, Mitaki-dera, and Hijiyama Park. The atomic bombings of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan were conducted by the United States during the final stages of World War II in 1945. The two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date.Following a firebombing campaign that destroyed many Japanese cities, the Allies prepared for a costly invasion of Japan. The war in Europe ended when Nazi Germany signed its instrument of surrender on 8 May, but the Pacific War continued. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on 26 July 1945, threatening Japan with "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum, and the United States deployed two nuclear weapons developed by the Manhattan Project. American airmen dropped Little Boy on the city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945, followed by Fat Man over Nagasaki on 9 August. Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000--166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000--80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. The Hiroshima prefecture health department estimated that, of the people who died on the day of the explosion, 60% died from flash or flame burns, 30% from falling debris and 10% from other causes. During the following months, large numbers died from the effect of burns, radiation sickness, and other injuries, compounded by illness. In a US estimate of the total immediate and short term cause of death, 15--20% died from radiation sickness, 20--30% from burns, and 50--60% from other injuries, compounded by illness. In both cities, most of the dead were civilians, although Hiroshima had a sizeable garrison.On 15 August, six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan announced its surrender to the Allies, signing the Instrument of Surrender on 2 September, officially ending World War II. The bombings led, in part, to post-war Japan's adopting Three Non-Nuclear Principles, forbidding the nation from nuclear armament. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and their ethical justification are still debated.
https://wn.com/Japan_Hiroshima_City_Part_7
Animated Cartoon: Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

Animated Cartoon: Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

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  • Duration: 8:28
  • Updated: 28 May 2012
  • views: 102526
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http://thefilmarchive.org/ During the final stages of World War II in 1945, the Allies of World War II conducted two atomic bombings against the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. These two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. Following a firebombing campaign that destroyed many Japanese cities, the Allies prepared for a costly invasion of Japan. The war in Europe ended when Nazi Germany signed its instrument of surrender on 8 May, but the Pacific War continued. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on 26 July 1945, threatening Japan with "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum, and two nuclear weapons developed by the Manhattan Project were deployed. Little Boy was dropped on the city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945, followed by the Fat Man over Nagasaki on 9 August. Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000--166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000--80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. The Hiroshima prefecture health department estimated that, of the people who died on the day of the explosion, 60% died from flash or flame burns, 30% from falling debris and 10% from other causes. During the following months, large numbers died from the effect of burns, radiation sickness, and other injuries, compounded by illness. In a US estimate of the total immediate and short term cause of death, 15--20% died from radiation sickness, 20--30% from burns, and 50--60% from other injuries, compounded by illness. In both cities, most of the dead were civilians, although Hiroshima had a sizeable garrison. On 15 August, six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan announced its surrender to the Allies, signing the Instrument of Surrender on 2 September, officially ending World War II. The bombings led, in part, to post-war Japan's adopting Three Non-Nuclear Principles, forbidding the nation from nuclear armament. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and their ethical justification are still debated. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombing_of_japan
https://wn.com/Animated_Cartoon_Atomic_Bombing_Of_Hiroshima_And_Nagasaki,_Japan
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